Posters

Titan’s Lakes

Titan’s Lakes

During the 1950s space exploration dominated science fiction, and a very distinct art style accompanied it. It is a beautifully unique style with its muted colors, its gradients, and its signature curves. The style was an embodiment of the wonderfully vague possibilities of space exploration. Comic books of the era depicted aliens from far away planets, space ships that traveled millions of lightyears away at the speed of light to discover things unimaginable to humans. The art style and the stories it told allowed the viewer to connect with this vacuum of collective excitement and infinite possibility that pulls humankind forward. This art provided a way to escape reality and imagine a future where your problems would be more interesting, and your horizons would be so much broader. At the rate of technological development, such a future did not seem that far away. These stories told you that soon this would be your reality. Soon, the future would arrive. Soon, we would be able to stand with our loved ones and watch the sunset from the moons of Saturn.

Lunar Escape

Lunar Escape

By the 1960s the space race was in full force, and with it a new wave of art that depicted space exploration. The focus of the art became much closer to earth, typically either showing the moon or earth orbit, as these places were the primary targets of the ongoing space race. Everything was becoming more real, more tangible. Yet in a sense, less personal. The vision shifted from a shared imagination of how we would live as a society in the future, to a more removed yet realistic illustration of the achievements happening at the time. There were far fewer drawings of elaborate, futuristic, space age cities, and an increasing number of pieces that showed lunar bases, and American or Soviet rockets. While this art was less personal it was no less exciting, space exploration related science fiction permeated the popular culture more deeply than it ever had before. The final frontier was finally attainable, and this art style was fuel for the futurist’s imagination. The illustrations showed that such space travel would one day be as routine as a vacation. They showed that someday you too will be able to take off too the moon, and slow down.

Kepler 186f

Kepler 186f